The History of Controllers

$_57

Ah, here we go.  Here’s a page with a fairly complete history of controllers.

I missed the SCR controllers.  This puppy is listed as “GE SCR Fork Lift Control EV-1 IC36450SC 5E9 R09 IC3645SCR1E9B0XAAF GE-S-SCR-EV1B” (on eBay), and the specs:

  • Length 9.5″ Width 7″ Height 5 1/4″
  • 18 Lbs
  • GE SCR Fork Lift Control EV-1 IC36450SC 5E9 R09 IC3645SCR1E9B0XAAF GE-S-SCR-EV1B
  • GE SCR Fork Lift Control EV-1 IC36450SC 5E9 R09 IC3645SCR1E9B0XAAF GE-S-SCR-EV1B
  • 24-84 Volts DC
  • Made In USA
  • Serial # PR EV1-001205
  • GE #1E9B0XAAD
  • Manufacturer: GE
  • Part # GE-S-SCR-EV1B

Here’s what I have for a timeline:

Speed Controller Timeline
1902 Baker Runabout Switch-Resistor Controller
1954 Georg Sichling (Seimens) files patent for US2867763A: System for controlling or regulating an electric motor by pulses of variable pulsing ratio (first instance of using transistors for “Pulse-width modulation”)
1957 Silicon controlled rectifier (AKA “thyristor”) commercialized by a team of power engineers led by Gordon Hall[ and commercialized by Frank W. “Bill” Gutzwiller of General Electric
1960 The Henney Kilowatt Contactor Controller (Renault-based EV)
1964-65 First patents mentioning “SCR” and “thyristor” motor speed control
1968 First instance of transistor-based Golf Cart Controller
1970s General Electric SCR ((Silicon Controlled Rectifier) controller: GE EV1
1980 Hans W. Becke and Carl F. Wheatley filed a patent application which they referred to as “power MOSFET”
1985 Non-latch-up IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistor) were first commercialized by Toshiba, capable of higher voltage than “power MOSFETs”.
1985 Curtis Instruments files US4626750A: “Solid state d.c. motor control” using “plurality of parallel-connected power field effect transistors arranged for connection in series with the traction motor…”.  This is the basis of the Curtis 1204 motor controller.
early 1990s DCP (precurser to Alltrax) and Zilla high-powered PWM controllers available to EV conversion and competation market.
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One response to “The History of Controllers

  1. Pingback: Sparky Gets a Re-Fit | The Electric Chronicles: Power in Flux·

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