Real-world riding- from Brian, of Brammo

I’m going to go ahead and re-post this from ElMoto.net– some thoughts from the ShockingBarack ride from the guy who designed the bike. The comments about the performance mods are the most interesting… it reminds me of digital photo vs. film- gas and electric are two different animals entirely, with different riding experiences.


So, obviously, I’ve spent some time in the saddle with the Enertia over its development. However, I must admit that living with the bike day-to-day has brought to light new experiences and realizations that never would have occurred in a controlled engineering environment. For example, the time it takes to coil a charge cord in a near freezing garage when you’ve got nothing on but what you wore to bed is much more critical than when you’re in a climate controlled work environment fully clothed! Here are my first and most significant observations in no particular order:

1. The batteries probably require closer to 5 discharge and charge cycles before they’re really working optimally. They kind of end up with a “false” balance on the first charge cycle, then diverge and converge again to give full performance in the above stated number of cycles.

2. Coiling the charge cord under the seat into a nice tight ring somehow pushes all of my OCD buttons. I’ve since purchased a small velcro “cable wrap” to keep everything nice and tidy.

3. When the infrastructure is in place, electric motorcycles will be the ultimate in performance customizing. Connecting through the CAN bus connector in the back of the dash, our service guys can adjust parameters to take the bike from forgiving commuter to screamin’ demon in a matter of minutes. On a gas bike, these kinds of performance changes would require A LOT of mechanical work and time.

4. My Ducati Monster 696 now feels like a chore to ride. Still love it for the canyon carving, but it’ll stay parked for the daily commute, that’s for sure.

5. The rear suspension feels just a bit harsh to me. I weigh a bit under the average US male (170 lbs vs. 190 lbs) and so I think the rear shock could be tuned a bit better to my weight. I’ll be talking to Aaron Bland (Lead Engineer) about how to adjust this next week. Perhaps I’ll post the procedure…

6. I like not having to go to a gas station on my way to work or back home!

All for now…

-Brian.

Thanks Brian!

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